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Home  >  Features  >  Number 1 Bullets Comic Reviews: January 13, 2016

NUMBER 1 BULLETS: 01-13-16

 

Warrior Women, lost Lanterns, and lots of Morphin' going on in this week's Number 1 Bullets! The stack this week: Deluge #1, Leaving Megalopolis: Surviving Megalopolis #1, Luna the Vampire #1, Gutter Magic #1, Red Sonja Vol. 3 #1, Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. #1, Mighty Morphing Power Rangers #0, The Legend of Wonder Woman #1, and Green Lantern Corps: Edge of Oblivion #1. 

 

 

Deluge #1 (Comics Experience)-

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Bursting out of Comics Experience's Digital program, Deluge #1 by new comer creators J.D. Olivia and Richard P. Clark tells the tale of the "cops and robbers" underbelly of New Orleans right before and into the onset of Hurricane Katrina. By no means the only story of this type in that setting, Deluge still has a way of setting itself apart. This crime thriller had me thoroughly engaged from page to page. It sets up enough back-history mystery to keep you reading even when we know very little about these characters, all of whom had unique voices and appearances. There were only two real issues holding this comic back from a 5-star rating: the art was a little rought at times, though always serviceable. The other was that I found a couple of typos that could have been cleaned up before hitting the digital press. That said, still a great story with a great set up, and some spot-on dialogue. Check this comic out here if you're looking for something fresh by some new faces. (Joe)

 

Leaving Megalopolis: Surviving Megalopolis #1 (Dark Horse Comics)-

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Dark Horse Comics latest #1 issue delves into a story about what happens if those sworn to protect the city suddenly turn against it.  Written by Gail Simone with art by J. Calafiore, Megalolopis was the safest city in the country due to the superheroes who protected it. But thanks to a toxic attack that turned said heroes into homicidal maniacs, it is now a quarantined war zone cut off from the rest of the world.  The set up is rather simple and the idea of heroes going bad is nothing new, so the question for the reader comes down to whether or not the execution of the story is interesting enough to hold one's attention.  In my opinion the answer is "no," or at best a tentative "no," with possible exception given to the fact that the second issue could break the story open.  As is stands, the writing is well done, the story is solid, but there is nothing unique about it by the time the last page is turned.  There are so many books with heroes going rogue and how to deal with them, that to stand out from the crowd the author needs to hit with something hard in the first issue to make it unique, and this book did not do that.  Violent imagery, cursing heroes in colorful costumes, a city under siege, and a lone young girl stuck behind the lines forced to take up the fight-- are all tropes that have been done again and again.  While the continuing story might expand into something more relevant, this review is for the first issue, and as that stands, it falls rather flat. (Geoff)

 

Green Lantern Corps: Edge of Oblivion #1 (DC Comics)-

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When we last saw the Green Lantern Corps, they were stuck in the "universe before ours". Well, they're still there and looking for a way out. Writer Tom Taylor joins veteran Green Lantern artist Ethan Van Sciver on a new adventure that (I imagine) aims to bring the Corps back home. Woo-ha! Van Sciver's art is as it always is. His style has not changed much over the years, and I know it tends to polarize some fans. I dig it. The action sequences and character structures are unmistakably Van Sciver, and it works. Tom Taylor's script does a good job hitting the right beats, but tends to lack a bit in the details. Some of the dialogue is a bit heavy-handed and there's quite a bit of exposition going on to explain everything. Still, a pretty good read and I'm happy to see the Corps' advetnures continuing. DC fans should check this out. (Joe)

 

The Legend of Wonder Woman #1 (DC Comics)-

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From DC's digital library comes The Legend of Wonder Woman, by Renae De Liz and Ray Dillon. This series takes place during Diana's pre-teen early years, focusing on her adventures on the Island of Themyscira. Or at least this first issue did and that seems to be the setting going forward. This was a lot of fun. The story is fairly run-of-the-mill, but also meets the basic beats. The art really shines. It was also interesting to get a little bit on the history of Hippolyta as well as Diana. That said, this origin seems to diverge from the one established in the New 52 Wonder Woman run. Not sure what the deal is there. In any case, this is pretty great all-ages read that a lot of people will probably be into. (Joe)

 

Gutter Magic #1 (IDW Publishing)-

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Gutter Magic is the first in a four-issue mini-series from IDW Publishing, created by Rich Douek and Brett Barkley.  The powers of the arcane were released during WWII and brought the Earth to the edge of destruction.  From the turmoil rose the Wizards who sat in their towers and ruled as lords above a world full of magic, beasts, and species of all kinds.  Those from the dregs of this new world often attempt to steal magic or artifacts to move up in society, this became known as Gutter Magic.  Infused with a steampunk vibe and an aesthetic that mixes modern New York City with Harry Potter, Gutter Magic was an enjoyable read that offered a refreshingly new idea.  We meet Cinder, a Gutter Magic user attempting to steal a spell that he hopes will ignite the latent magic in his genes that has been passed down through his family.  The art is solid and the story is engaging. Add to that a twist at the end that brings into question whether or not atomic bomb inventor J. Robert Oppenheimer was a wizard, and you have a solid first issue that really grabs the reader.  This is definitely worth checking out, especially since it is a mini-series so the commitment is small. (Geoff)

 

Luna the Vampire #1 (IDW Publishing)-

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IDW's latest #1 issue is Luna the Vampire, written and drawn by Yasmin Sheikh.  Luna is a rather adorable young vampire who lives in space and ends up on wacky adventures ... and that is all I really got out of this book.  This is one of those difficult reviews because it is a title that is not even remotely intended for me.  The zany antics and super cartoony art style remind me of children's cartoons like The Regular Show or Adventure Time.  I will say that the character art is cute and endearing and Luna herself is kinda funny in a severely over-the-top ADHD kind of way.  This book would appeal to young readers, boys or girls, and perhaps some of you developmentally stunted millennials out there who have convinced yourselves that this kind of stuff is 'cool' and 'hip'. [Editor's Note: The Opinions expressed in this review are those of the reviewers and do not reflect MightyVille's opinions as a while. Thank you.] (Geoff)  

 

Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. #1 (Marvel Comics)-

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From comic to TV show to comic again, Marvel has relaunched Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. with a new number one this month.  Penned by Marc Guggenheim with art by German PeraltaAgents of S.H.I.E.L.D. follows Phil Coulson and his team as they deal with the fallout of Tony Stark's Iron Man tech being leaked to the public.  Someone has used one of Stark's old suits to break into the pentagon and steal encrypted files that detail how to take out the world's superheroes.  Those of you getting flashbacks to Batman's files on how to take out the Justice League in the Tower of Babel arc are not alone, that is instantly what I thought of when I read this book.  With that being said, just because an idea is not unique does not mean the story cannot be good.  As a fan of the show I liked the representations of the characters in this title, the only misstep being an highly unlikely romance subplot between Fitz and Agent May.  Coulson's characteristic snark and May's cold demeanor are all on point and Guggenheim has their voices down well.  The art by Peralta is good with clean lines and dynamic page layouts, the action moves well and he has a talent with facial expressions.  This was a fun read and nicely ties into the current story line in Iron Man. Fans of the show should definitely check this out despite the horrific idea of Fitz and May getting together. (Geoff)

 

Mighty Morphing Power Rangers #0 (BOOM! Studios)-

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It's Morphin' Time! See, I know that without ever having seen an episode of the show, which speaks to the powerhouse marketing behind this film and TV franchise. In this new series from writer Kyle Higgins and artist Hendry Prasetya, BOOM! is somehwat hitting the reboot button. Like I said, I am unfamiliar with the history of these characters, so I am not sure how all this fits into the over-all chronology. Taking place right after the Green Ranger joins the side of the angels and betrays the villainous Rita Repulsa, this is mainly a set-up issue that outlines who the members of the team are and what they can do.  The main story is short, so I was hoping for a little more meat, but it's a zero isue and meant to leave space for some back-ups. It's a solid start that takes itself pretty seriously, and I enjoyed what I read. Some of the diloaug ews trying  alittle too hard and the villains are quite one-note, but I imagine that stick pretty close to the source materials. There were two back-up, short stories in this issue as well, neither one all that engaging. (Joe)

 

Red Sonja Vol. 3 #1 (Dynamite Entertainment)- 

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Dynamite Comics is back with a third volume of Red Sonja and an all new #1.  Written by Marguerite Bennett with art by Aneke, Red Sonja is faced with her greatest threat ever ... boredom.  The land of Hyrkania has a new king, and it is a time of unprecedented peace.  No roving bands of raiders, no monsters, no thieves, and no war.  While most would smile upon this good fortune, it does not leave much adventuring for Sonja the She Devil.  However, as it is with all scenarios in comics that are too good to be true, Sonja soon learns that this new-found peace comes with a very high price.  Of the various Red Sonja comics I have read, this issue stands out in that it takes a lighter tone to a character who is usually written as cold and ruthless.  Sonja actually feels like a real person and not a caricature of sex and violence, and it is a welcome departure.  There is action, humor, emotion, and an interesting look at what a warrior becomes with no war to fight.  The art by Aneke is extremely solid for the most part with clean lines and fantastic coloring, there were only a few panels that stood out as awkward, but over-all the book is very well drawn.  It was also nice to see Sonja in more than just a metal bikini; Aneke maintains her beauty and sex appeal while giving the character more robust armor and a cloak.  This issue was a fun, quick read that was well paced with a good balance of humor and action.  I think it is an easy one to recommend to fans of the character as well as a good jumping on point for new readers. (Geoff)

 

Don't just take our word for it. Read the books yourself and let us know what you thought!

 

More Reviews on MightyVille:

Number 1 Bullets Comic Reviews: January 6, 2016

Number 1 Bullets Comic Reviews: December 30, 2015

Number 1 Bullets Comic Reviews: December 23, 2015

 

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